The Drowned God

He crossed the sea with powerful strokes,
Taming the ocean blue,
Every single wave he coaxed
Would part and let him through.

A god, a man, a mystery
Who’s legend is untold.
Abandoned at a fishery
When he was one year old.

Throughout the years, he earned his keep
Helping his father trawl.
And every fish that he would reap,
Would fill their market stall.

Rumors then began to fly
Around the village squares.
He was not a normal guy,
And neither were his wares.

He was too big, they used to say,
For being twenty-three.
What’s more, his eyes were gray,
And shimmered like the sea.

The elders spoke in whispered tones
About the god who drowned
To offer up his very bones
And save the village ground.

Legend said he would return
Once his debt was paid.
But the elders had much to learn
About the drowned god’s aid.

The reason that he gave his life
To help the village grow
Was to protect them from the rife
Of monsters down below.

When the fearsome beasts awoke
Smelling the village men,
A voice inside the young man spoke;
The drowned god lived again.

As the monsters slithered near
Anxious to devour,
The villagers quaked in fear
At the new god’s power.

He split the oceans with a roar
Tearing those beasts apart.
Then, standing on the bloodied shore,
These words did he impart:

“Once again, I’ve saved your town,
Fulfilling my last vow.
No more will I have to drown,
But still, I leave you now.

There are others I must save,
More promises to keep.”
Then he walked into a wave
Making the townsfolk weep.

Now the young man swims alone
Keeping the beasts at bay.
Forever hoping to atone
The ones he did betray.

Because of him, the monsters roam
And terrorize the land.
Now, the ocean is his home;
An endless reprimand.

So if you’re ever by the shore,
Stare out into the deep.
You may just glimpse some ancient lore:
The Drowned God on his sweep.

 


I woke up with the phrase “He crossed the sea with powerful strokes taming the ocean blue” stuck in my head, and this is the result!

Your prompt is to find a phrase and use it as the first lines of a poem!

And, if you’re willing to share, I’d love to see them in the comments!

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